Latest News

Jul 2017: The Global Initiative to End all Corporal Punishment of Children, with support from Save the Children Sweden, has put together a new series of three booklets which provide answers to the questions that arise when we think about prohibiting all corporal punishment of children.

These booklets should give parents/caregivers, government officials, education professionals and others the confidence to support and pursue legal reform and move a step closer to realising children’s right to protection from all forms of violence in all settings.

Dec 2016: Marking the 10th anniversary of the UN World Report on Violence against Children, the Global Initiative to End all Corporal Punishment produced this report to celebrates the significant progress made in the last decade and highlights the shortcomings; it sets out what still needs to be done to end all corporal punishment of children, and how to do it. Download Ending legalised violence against children: Global Progress to December 2016 today.

Nov 2016: Ahead of Universal Children’s Day (20 November), the Global Initiative, Save the Children, and the Churches’ Network for Non-violence are delighted to launch Ending corporal punishment of children – A Handbook for Multi-Religious Gatherings, marking the 10th anniversaries of the UN Study on Violence against Children and A Multi-religious Commitment to End Violence against Children – Kyoto Declaration. The handbook highlights opportunities for advocacy and action and encourages multi-religious collaboration including through global movements to end violence against children. It also contains a guide to reflection and discussion on A Multi-religious Commitment to End Violence Against Children – Kyoto Declaration, also available in booklet form.

Nov 2016: Violence against children in the form of corporal punishment is still allowed in the home in South Africa under the guise of reasonable chastisement. The Government of South Africa has been holding public hearings on the Children’s Bill. The WGPD noted that the prohibition of corporal punishment was not included in this amendment and made this submission. Read more

May 2016: Religions for Peace and UNICEF convened a global consultation of religious leaders and experts in Toledo, Spain, to provide a religious perspective on the UN Secretary General’s Study on Violence against Children and to look at ways of supporting the report’s recommendations. Participants from 30 countries representing many world religions were challenged to draw on the unique strengths and skills of religious leaders and communities to find solutions and adopt strategies to protect children from violence. An important outcome of the consultation was a declaration of  “A Multi-Religious Commitment to Confront Violence against Children” which was formally adopted at the Eighth World Assembly of Religions for Peace in Kyoto, Japan, August 2006.

April 2016: Spanking and child outcomes Around the world, 80% of children are spanked or otherwise physically punished by their parents. The question of whether parents should spank their children to correct misbehaviours sits at a nexus of arguments from ethical, religious, and human rights perspectives. Several hundred studies have been conducted on the associations between parents’ use of spanking or physical punishment and children’s behavioural, emotional, cognitive, and physical outcomes, making spanking one of the most studied aspects of parenting. What has been learned from these studies? Read more

April 2016: Hugs not Hits Many parents believe that spanking is an effective way to promote children’s positive behaviour, yet few studies have examined spanking and the development of social competence. Using information from 3,279 families with young children who participated in a longitudinal study of urban families, this study tested competing hypotheses regarding whether maternal spanking or maternal warmth predicted increased social competence and decreased child aggression over time and which parent behaviour was a stronger predictor of these changes. Read more

April 2016: Family Relations The notion that negative childhood experiences can be sources of toxic stress that have short and long-term consequences for children’s health and well-being has gained increasing attention in recent years. The family environment can be a key source of stress, particularly when parents inflict pain on children; when that pain rises to the level of physical abuse the stress is thought to be toxic. This article considers the possibility that non-abusive physical punishment may also constitute a source of toxic stress in the lives of children that affects their brain structure and functioning. The research linking physical abuse and physical punishment to children’s brain structure and functioning is summarized, and the article concludes with a discussion of implications for future research, policy, and practice. Read more

30 March 2016: Much is happening around corporal punishment in South Africa and things are about to get even busier. In this Update three issues will be covered. South Africa has finally submitted its long outstanding Country Reports to the African Committee on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACERWC) and the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC). In addition, the South African Human Rights Commission released its findings on the Joshua Generation Church (JGC), against which a complaint was laid by a married couple who live near the Church in Blouberg, and two members of the WGPD (Sonke Gender Justice and Carol Bower of Linali Consulting). An amendment to the Children’s Act is slowly inching towards being on the table again, and we are expecting some activity on this quite soon. Read More

14 March 2016: Despite it being banned since 1997, many teachers in South African schools continue to dish out corporal punishment, often for mundane offences. Read More 

 

 

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